5 Characteristics of Effective WordPress Themes – Part 2

(For part 1, please click here)

Keep in mind that the reason of your website is to Provide timely, appropriate content to your website visitors, Any theme that preserves or boosts the reader experience is beneficial, any theme that subtracts from the experience is undesirable.

Anyone can start a blog today! 

 

4) SEO – Search Engine Optimization

We can say a lot about search engine optimization, yet when all is said and done, if you have articles or blog posts worthy of reading sooner or later you'll get the ratings you deserve. That doesn't imply that you don't require SEO; it simply indicates that as far as optimization is concerned all you really will need to do is to be completely sure:

(a) Your tags have the right format, with the name of the article 1st followed by the name of the website – some themes can do this instantly without the need of changes to the code or use of a plugin

(b) All your weblog posts titles use the H1 tag, with the primary key phrases used as an alternative  to non-descriptive words and phrases for superior SEO value

(b) Your theme contains clean source codes, and ideally all formatting is connected to an external CSS file which you can edit individually

5) Plug-And-Play User-Friendliness 

Can the theme be mounted effortlessly on an existing web site without any problem? Can the exact same theme be utilized and tailored quickly on your other blogs? These are some additional things you may want to consider when theme-shopping, especially if every minute of downtime on your weblog could possibly mean lost product sales.

While it's difficult to make comparisons because of the huge volume of free and paid themes readily available, it's still a fantastic idea to have a test site. Look at any theme you plan on having, and make sure your test site is also equipped with all the plugins and widgets utilized on your real website. The final point you want is for your site visitors  to begin observing odd error messages on your blog site.

When all is said and done, a theme is merely a theme. It's always a great idea to outsource the job and focus much more on your visitors.

5 Characteristics of Effective WordPress Themes – Part 1

If you're running a blog on WordPress, the first thing you'll most likely do is to put in a new WordPress theme. Even if you've been running a blog for years you might continue to be a theme "fan", wasting a lot of time doing tiny changes that when summed up simply distracts you from focusing on content.

It's definitely straightforward to see why this one aspect of managing a website requires so much attention. The right theme will enable your to place all or your widgets and codes wherever you need them to be, and may also get much better search engine scores and tons of fresh traffic each and every day.

A Clean Theme to Enjoy! 

So what are the elements you need to take into account to make theme-hunting a lot easier? Here are five important elements:

1) Theme Width and Columns

Traditionally, WordPress themes have always had either 2-column or 3-column formats. If you're running a blog for non-profit, a 2-column theme can appear more compact and easier to brose and read. Given that you have fewer pictures of products or hyperlinks to other internet websites to display, you can concentrate entirely on the content material without leading visitors away from your web page.

Having said that, if you're blogging for financial gain, you may well want to check out a 3-column WordPress theme that will enable you to use Google Adsense, and other kinds of Text Link Ads codes easily without compressing everything in the content area. 3-column themes give the webmaster enough room for growth, but if at some point you've filled up all available space with adverts, then it's time you eliminated the non-performers and use only the ones that do perform well in your specific website.

2) Use of Pics and Icons

A theme with pictures and icons can look Fantastic, but it hardly ever improves your website traffic or subscriber base. Actually, the majority of top bloggers have simple themes with a basic logo on top. Getting rid of unnecessary images also usually means faster loading time and less pressure on your servers. This critical aspect of server burden becomes crystal clear only if you have thousands of site visitors a day, but it's worth planning for the long term.

An image-laden theme also distracts people from the content material itself. That's why many important blogs use stunning pictures in the content areas to increase value to a posting, but the theme itself is very simple and quite minimalist.

Ideally, a theme should really enable you to use your own header graphic for more powerful branding reasons, but substitute pictures and icons with hyperlinks and text, or simply not use them at all unless of course, it is completely vital.

3) Compatibility with Plugins

Another time-consuming activity is setting up plugins that boost the overall performance of your web-site. There's a plugin for practically everything you need to do with your site, but although most of them are absolutely free and easily available, it's not often easy to set up the plugins and add the codes into your WordPress theme.

If your theme is far too complex, it might be a hassle to even add a single line of code you require to make a plugin do the job. This is frequently the case with highly developed themes that have too many data files and major coding. I've always favored less complicated themes that adhere to the default WordPress theme as much as possible, so I can dramatically reduce the learning curve and just move on to the things that really matter more.

To be continued in part 2